The Rural Council considers it fundamental to sound
planning: Treat waste as close to its source as possible.


...That means each municipality must develop a local solution to managing its
garbage, rather than simply transporting the problem to some other community.

The RCOC believes that the Ottawa Citizen articles (below) describe
what may well become the best modern-day solution for ALL of our cities:
 

(Links to other reference information are at bottom of this page)

 


From the...


Incineration the solution for Carp Road landfill

Tory: New technology is the cure for 'urgent' trash crisis, Ontario opposition leader says

Patrick Dare
The Ottawa Citizen                                              Saturday, February 25, 2006

The leader of Ontario's Conservative party says the province must incinerate its garbage because nobody wants landfills in their neighbourhoods and the province needs the power that can be generated from incineration plants.

John Tory, the leader of the opposition in the Ontario legislature, said yesterday the uproar over a proposed landfill expansion on Carp Road

 
CREDIT: Wayne Cuddington, The Ottawa Citizen

The Carp Road landfill, viewed from Terry Fox Drive, is a growing blight on the landscape for many residents. The licensed space of the landfill, seen behind Scotiabank Place, will run out in about four years.
 
-- which takes half of Ottawa's garbage -- is just part of a provincewide crisis in waste management.

Landfills are filling up, while applications to establish new ones or expand old ones meet fierce opposition. Cities are left to contemplate what they should do with their garbage when the provincial licences for landfills run out. The applications process for new or expanded landfills takes years.

 
 
If the U.S. Congress allows the prohibition on Canadian trash, Ontario communities would be in trouble.

Mr. Tory estimates that using the province's remaining landfills would only last for perhaps six months and communities outside Toronto wouldn't be too pleased about taking the city's garbage.

 

 
 

Toronto exports its garbage to Michigan, an embarrassment for many Ontario politicians. But the Michigan senate recently passed legislation banning Canadian trash. If the U.S. Congress allows the prohibition on Canadian trash, Ontario communities would be in trouble.

Mr. Tory estimates that using the province's remaining landfills would only last for perhaps six months and communities outside Toronto wouldn't be too pleased about taking the city's garbage.

"It's a very urgent crisis," said Mr. Tory.

He said the first priority in waste should be to recycle and reduce, but says there will always be garbage so the province must look to incineration plants to burn it and produce power for a province that has a serious electricity shortage.

Many people's knee-jerk reaction opposing incineration is based on information that is out of date, said Mr. Tory.

"The technology has evolved," he said, adding plants are now safe and efficient and can operate well within pollution standards.

He noted that in many European cities incineration power plants are in central neighbourhoods. A garbage incineration plant that has operated in Brampton since the early 1990s is proof that such plants can work well, he said.

The Brampton incinerator -- approved when the alternative was an unwanted new landfill site -- handles about 155,000 tonnes of garbage a year, generating up to nine megawatts of power, with most of the electricity sent to the provincial power grid. Air emissions are reduced by a three-stage pollution-control system.

 
 
Mr. Sterling said the garbage incineration option is attractive to community leaders who are looking for alternatives to more messy landfills, and he said the technology of incineration is greatly improved, screening out the heavy metals that old incineration methods used to pump into the air.

 
 

Mr. Tory said Ontario needs to start planning for incineration-power plants right away because getting approval for and constructing such operations takes several years. He said the provincial government has tended to leave waste issues to the municipalities but they are not equipped to do so on their own.

He said there should be a provincewide strategy that uses the best expertise in the field.

Norm Sterling, the MPP for Lanark-Carleton, said yesterday that the expansion of the garbage landfill on Carp Road, proposed by Waste Management of Canada, is not appropriate for one of Ottawa's fastest growing neighbourhoods.

City councillors and many residents in the area are complaining that the landfill -- dubbed Carp Mountain or Mount Trashmore -- has already become huge, creating severe odour problems and ruining the capital's landscape. The landfill licensed space will run out in about four years.

"I don't think you go ahead with an expansion of this size without seriously looking at alternative plans," said Mr. Sterling. "This community has been quite generous in the past in terms of their tolerance of the existing landfill site.

"They've done their bit. An alternate site, or an alternative method of waste disposal, is absolutely necessary for them to look at," he said.

Goulbourn Ward Councillor Janet Stavinga met with the company yesterday and got an agreement to extend the period for public comment in the first stage of the long approval process for the landfill expansion.

A second open house on the issue is set for Stittsville on March 1, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at 5473 Abbott St.

The company is proposing to more than double the capacity of its landfill, creating 18 million more cubic metres of landfill.

Mr. Sterling said that rather than looking at a single landfill expansion question, the city and the provincial government should be looking at the whole city's waste issues and possible solutions, including landfill and incineration.

 
 
A garbage incineration plant that has operated in Brampton since the early 1990s is proof that such plants can work well.

 
 

He noted there's a second application for a landfill expansion coming from Waste Services Inc. for its landfill at Navan.

That project -- to extend the landfill's life by 10 to 15 years -- has generated some concern but not nearly the level of hostile reaction that the Carp Road expansion is sparking. The Navan landfill takes commercial and industrial garbage which is less smelly.

Mr. Sterling said the garbage incineration option is attractive to community leaders who are looking for alternatives to more messy landfills, and he said the technology of incineration is greatly improved, screening out the heavy metals that old incineration methods used to pump into the air.

But he said incineration is extremely expensive and it could add up to $20 million a year to the City of Ottawa's tax bill.

 The Ottawa Citizen 2006



Previously in the Ottawa Citizen...

Incinerate Carp waste, councillor urges

Generate power instead of expanding dump: El-Chantiry

Patrick Dare
The Ottawa Citizen

Thursday, February 23, 2006

Ontario should be encouraging the incineration of garbage, rather than expansion of the landfill on Carp Road, Councillor Eli El-Chantiry says.

Mr. El-Chantiry said yesterday Ottawa should follow the example of the Region of Peel, where a private company handles about 155,000 tonnes of garbage a year through incineration, generating up to nine megawatts of electricity in the process -- enough power to keep the lights on in thousands of homes.

His comments followed reports that Waste Management of Canada, which operates the landfill site on Carp Road, in Mr. El-Chantiry's ward, has started the application process to more than double the space for dumping garbage. Waste Management wants to expand either north or west and generate four megawatts of electricity by capturing gas from the landfill and using it as fuel for a power turbine.

The proposal is already creating controversy. Mr. El-Chantiry said residents of his West Carleton ward, like those in the neighbouring ward of Goulbourn Councillor Janet Stavinga, have kept quiet for years about the smell emanating from the Carp Road landfill and its existence as an eyesore because they knew the company's licensed capacity would run out in a few years. Now, he said, people are upset that Waste Management wants to expand the operation by 18 million cubic metres -- enough space to keep operating for another 25 years.

"It's no longer in the middle of nowhere. Why wouldn't they look for another site?" said Mr. El-Chantiry.

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment said yesterday the province is open to proposals for garbage incinerators, as well as new or expanded landfills. Ministry spokesman John Steele said, "we'll look at anything that comes forward. I don't know why there aren't more applications for incineration."

 
 
Mr. El-Chantiry said residents of his West Carleton ward, like those in the neighbouring ward of Goulbourn Councillor Janet Stavinga, have kept quiet for years about the smell emanating from the Carp Road landfill and its existence as an eyesore because they knew the company's licensed capacity would run out in a few years.

 
 

Mr. Steele noted there have been problems at the Carp landfill dating from 1971, when the site was operated by a previous owner as a simple dump. The Ministry of the Environment issued an order in 2002 to handle contaminated water that was moving off the site. A groundwater barrier, and a system for collecting contaminated water, were installed.

Mr. Steele said there are exhaustive studies and examinations to be done to determine whether the proposed project for Ottawa remains a landfill site or an incinerator.

Mr. El-Chantiry said it's time to look at alternatives to landfills, especially incineration.

An incinerator plant has worked well in Brampton since 1992, serving a region that doesn't have space for landfills and ships much of its garbage to Michigan.

The chairwoman of the waste committee in the Region of Peel, Maja Prentice, said her community is examining expansion of the incinerator at Brampton. "It has been a success," she said. "It is very well operated."

The plant's location in an industrial area, and regular testing of emissions showing they are within provincial standards, have kept complaints to a minimum, said Ms. Prentice.

Ontario needs to follow the lead of European countries that are environmentally conscious, but still incinerate garbage because they have no room for landfills, she said, adding that it's embarrassing that the province exports much of its garbage to Michigan.

The Brampton incinerator has been so successful that the Niagara-Hamilton region is also looking at building one.

The Brampton plant uses natural gas and burns garbage to produce steam that drives a turbine generator to produce electricity. About one-quarter of the power is used to run the plant while the rest is sent to the provincial power grid.

The thermal combustion is in two stages, the second one at temperatures of at least 1,000 C. The ash from the process is carted to neighbouring landfill sites where it is sometimes used as cover. There's a chance the ash could be processed into bricks or asphalt in the future. The plant employs 62 people.

Gases that are generated are treated in three stages before they are emitted through a stack. Algonquin Power says its emissions for lead, dioxins, furans, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, are well within provincial pollution standards.

However, incinerators are not the total solution to garbage problems, said Bob Dodds, director of operations at Algonquin Power Trust, the company that operates the Brampton incinerator. Incineration works well for much of the garbage that can't be recycled, he said, but municipalities still need to handle the waste that can be recycled separately, so the need for some landfills remains.

Mr. Dodds said his enterprise -- a conservative income fund with a wide variety of energy projects in North America -- wouldn't want to do the work to set up such a facility in Ottawa, but would be happy to operate one if it were built.

 The Ottawa Citizen 2006



Links to other reference information:

Terms of Reference document for landfill expansion proposal - DRAFT- Dated Jan 20, 2006

Summary of presentation made by WM at the Feb. 7, 2006 Open House in West Carleton

Website of Waste Management of Canada Limited

Website of the Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants (CEWEP)

Website: Ottawalandfillwatch.org

Website: Carpdump.ca

Website: NoDump.ca

Website, SaveDanford.com, has good information on "All liners Will Fail" and "Avian Flu"

http://www.normsterling.com/news/2006/March/dump_Petition.pdf

 
CFRA WEB POLL - March 1, 2006
The State of Michigan is about to ban Toronto garbage from a Detroit dump (effective this summer). Should the City of Ottawa council pass a motion - banning garbage from outside our municipal boundaries - and demand the Province endorse the "local garbage only" bylaw?
Yes
93.9%
No
6.07%
Total Votes: 1976
 
 

Related Stories:

Mar. 04 - 2006   Letters to Editor: "Incineration experts" and "Councillors' failure"

Mar. 07 - 2006   Incineration debate stuck in past era, air quality expert says

Mar. 15 - 2006   City inked landfill agreement in '01 -The Ottawa Sun

Mar. 16 - 2006   Council's back-room dump deal sickens opponents

Mar. 18 - 2006   City hauled into court - The Ottawa Sun


 

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